CLOZE TEST - FOR ENGLISH IN ALL EXAMS

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CLOZE TEST - FOR ENGLISH IN ALL EXAMS

In a cloze passage, some words are left and blank spaces are provided, each of which is numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested. Out of five words, one fits the blank appropriately in the context of the whole passage. You have to choose that word in each case which is the most appropriate. First, read the passage over and try to understand what it is about and then fill in the blanks with the help of the alternative words given, so that a meaningful-passage can be formed. KnowLedge of vocabulary and usage of English language are helpful in solving such questions. In selecting the appropriate word one must keep in mind the following aspects:

(i) Preceding and following words of the blank space concerned.

(ii) The meaning which the sen-tence intends to convey.

(iii) Context of the whole passage and the message which the author likes to convey through the facts given in the passage.

(iv) The meaning of all the alter-native words and their suitability.

It should be noted that the selec¬tion of word for a particular blank space may be conditioned by the se¬lection of another word for a different blank space. Therefore, a rough men¬~al work may be helpful in selecting' the appropriate word for each blank space.

Directions (1-10) : In the follow¬ing passage, there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the pas¬sage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Jamshedji Tata is ill to be the path¬finder of modern industrial builders. He is known as the grand-father of the in-dian industry for his acumen and en-thusiasm. Nobody else could have L2l of the new industries started by Jamshedji at the time when' industrial . ill and revolution was yet to come to India.

Jamshedji's father Nasarvanji Tata used to trade in jute with China and Britain. He started ill from India. Jamshedji started a cloth mill in Nagpur more than hundred years ago. At. that time almost all the @ used to come from Lancashire in England. What Jamshedji .LID was praiseworthy.

Jamshedji ill very well that an in-dustrial revolution can only be brought in the country by setting up iron and' steel industry. !ID he did not live to see the industry he had in mind, he had done all fID. work. In fact, he laid the ground work for it. He had planned the entire steel city now known as Jamshedpur, complete with streets, roads, schools, parks, play grounds, temples, mosques, churches, etc. His !1Ql was fulfilled by his sons, Sir Dorabji tata and Sir Rattan Tata, when they started the Tata Iron & Steel Factory in 1907 just after three years of his death.

1. (1) agreed (2) empowered

(3) determined (4) considered

(5) rewarded

2. (1) thought (3) set

(5) absolved

3. (1) acts (2) machinery

(3) awakening (4) factories (5) imports

4. (1) industries (2) import

(3) trade (4) dispatch

(5) export

5. (1) imports (2) cloth

(3) machines (4) industries

(5) goods

6. (1) dreamt (3) told

(5) did

7. (1) advocated (2) planned

(3) thought (4) knew

(5) felt

8. (1) Although (2) Suprisingly

(3) Luckily (4) Even

(5) Because

9. (1) complete (2) trivial

(3) preliminary (4) external (5) insignificant

10. (1) task (2) dream

(3) industry (4) sentiment

(5) need

[Corporation Bank Clerk Exam, 18.06.2006]

Directions (11-20) : In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Working under the psychometric approach, both scientists and practi-tioners have placed undue emphasis upon a unitary concept of intelligence as reflected in the single 1.0. They seem to have i!.!2 too much attention to the products of intelligent behaviour rather than the processes used to ac¬quire (12) products. Such attention to product rather than to process tends to mask qualitative differences in the processes by (13) individuals interact with their environment and to ~ at¬tention away from the possibility of qualitative changes in the nature of these processes (15) the course of cognitive development.

Haywood points out that there is no such thing as intelligence. There are in fact many intelligences. Factor ana¬lysts, i1..§1 have studies the nature of intellect by intellect by examining its apparent structure across different age groups and different segments of the population have to a great !!Z} dis-credited the unitary concept of intelli-gence. Even so, the structure theories of intelligence are (18) concerned with products and not with processes.

A very promising approach to the nature of intelligence in recent years is the process development (Cognitive Development) approach. It UJll upon the cognitive processes used to re¬ceive, code, and (20) information.

11. (1) gives (2) gave

(3) forced (4) given

(5) taken

12. (1) those (3) that (5) this

13. (1) how

(3) speech (5) which

14. (1) draw (3) force (5) drag

15. (1) at

(3) during (5) for

16. (1) who (3) might (5) whom

17. (1) meaning (2) person

(3) extend (4) extent

(5) value 18.(1) uptill (3) until (5) still

19. (1) focus (3) jumps (5) focused

20. (1) pack (3) store (5) hoard

[United Bank of India Clerk Exam, 24.07.2005]

ANSWERS I

1. (4) 2. (1) 3. (3) 4. (2) 5. (2)

6. (5) 7. (4) 8. (1) 9.(3) 10.(2) 

11.(4) 12. (2) 13. (5) 14. (1) 15. 

16. (1)(3) 17. (4) 18. (5) 19. (2) 20. (3)

Directions (1-10) : I n the follow¬ing passage, there are blanks, each of which has ,been numbered. These numbers are printed below the pas¬sage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

With the (1) of Indian economy (2.) various reforms initiated, banking sector (~), a pivotal role in the pro¬cess of achieving (~) economic growth and also in (~) the social well being at large. The Public sector (Q) in India have the twin tasks ahead of meeting the social banking (Z) and at the same time generating (8.) profits to meet the costs associated with growth. At present, banks have more than 76.1 per cent of their total branch (~) in rural and semi-urban (10).

1. (1) nationalisation (2) expansion

(3) liberalisation

(4) computerisation (5) accommodation

2. (1) from (2) over

(3) between (4) through

(5) thorough

3. (1) manages (2) occupies

(3) facilitates (4) naturalise

(5) conquers

4. (1) fewer (3) higher (5) lesser

5. (1) increasing (2) enhancing (3) encouraging (4) improving (5) innovating

6. (1) organisations (2) companies (3) corporations (4) banks

(5) institutions

7. (1) limitations (2) obligations

(3) derivatives (4) facilities (5) liabilities

8. (1) beautiful (2) lumpsum

(3) adequate (4) wonderful

(5) everlasting

9. (1} map

(3) network (5) graph '

10. (1) households (2) residences (3) areas

(4) locals

(5) suburbs

[Syndicate Bank Clerk Exam, 17.04.2005]

Directions (11-20) : In the follow¬ing passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the pas¬sage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropri¬ate word in each case.

In any organised group of mam-mals, no matter how co-operative, there is always a U1l for social domi¬nance. As he pursues this each adult individual {1g} a particular social rank, giving him his position, or status in the group hierarchy. The situation never remains!1.ID for very long, largely be-cause all the status strgglers are UAl older. When the overlords or 'top¬dogs' become senile, their seniority is challenged and they are !.1ID. by their immediate subordinates. There is then renewed dominance squabbling as !1ID moves a little further up the so¬cial ladder. At the other end of the scale, the younger members of the group are maturing rapidly, keeping up the pressure from UZl. In the ad¬dition, certain members of the group may suddenly be UID down by dis¬ease or accidental death leaving gaps in the hi'erarchy that have to be quickly filled.

The general result is a constant condition of status tension. Under natural L1ID. this tension remains tol-erable because of the limited size of the social grouping. If, however, in the artificial environment of captivity, the group size becomes too big, or the space available too small, then the

'rat race' soon gets out of hand, dominance battle rage uncontrollably and the leaders of the packs, prides, colonies or tribes come under (20) strain.

11. (1) stress (2) feel

(3) struggle (4) war

(5) envy

12. (1) desire (3) inherits (5) acquires

13. (1) unstable (2) stable (3) equitable (4) equal (5) calm

14. (1) growing (2) aheading

(3) looking (4) feeling

(5) moving

15. (1) piked (3) thrown (5) insulted

16. (1) no-one (3) junior

(5) everyone

17. (1) below (3) sides (5) behind

18. (1) come (3) feel (5) run

19. (1) upbringing (2) forces

(3) conditions (4) pressures

(5) preconditions

20. (1) desirable (2) severe (3) unwanted (4) stress (5) productive

[Corporation Bank Clerk Exam, 07.11.2004]

ANSWERS 1

1. (3) 2. (4) 3. (2) 4.(3)

5. (4) 6. (4) 7. (2) 8. (3)

9. (3) 10. (3) 11. (3) 12. (3)

13. (5) 14. (1) 15. (4) 16. (5)

17. (5) 18. (4) 19. (3) 20. (2)




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